An uncontested divorce is when both parties involved are not fighting the process. Most spouses who separate in Florida will come to an agreement when divorce papers are filed. This can move the proceedings much faster and thus help each ex get on with their lives. However, a couple of things need to be in place for a divorce to be truly “uncontested.” One is that there are no major financial disputes and that both parties agree to the divorce.

How to be eligible for an uncontested divorce

To be eligible for an uncontested divorce, you cannot have any lingering issues with your ex-spouse. This means that there are zero disagreements regarding spousal support, child custody, property division and child support, to name a few. However, all this begins with one person in the relationship filing for divorce. It should be noted that divorce is not uncontested until the other spouse agrees to all the terms.

How you benefit from an uncontested divorce

One of the most beneficial parts of going through an uncontested divorce is that you save a large amount of money on court and attorney fees. Although any type of divorce does hold the risk of conflict rising from one person or the other, an uncontested divorce greatly minimizes that risk.

Negatives of this type of divorce

Some of the things that you’re letting go of when you choose to go the uncontested route are certain child custody agreements. Yes, you may be able to save money by not contesting, but you’re also trading off having a greater say in how your child is raised or visitation times.

An uncontested divorce can be a rather simple and time-saving process to take. However, this does not mean you should go into the process without retaining a family law attorney. You never know when things might change on your ex-spouse’s side.